One Green Blood's State of Mind

Monday Motivator: The Important Moments

By Scott Westerman
Listen to an audio version of this message.

This is the time of year when lots of so-called important things are happening. The Super Bowl, with it’s multi-million dollar commercials. The college basketball season is heating up. Who will win an academy award? Who’s marrying, divorcing, pregnant, fighting, making up? What do I have to get done tomorrow? We rush from calendar item to calendar item. Tension seems to ebb and flow, even though the undercurrent of stress and discomfort never seems to totally go away. And this is a life?

Sometimes we need something to re-focus us on what’s really important. I thought that this week would be a good time to share a well-traveled tale that, by all rights should be the stuff of urban legend. But it’s not. Snopes confirms that it’s true. Whenever my life starts to get out of balance, I pull it out and read it again. Ken Nurburn experienced it. Take a moment right now to put yourself behind the drivers seat of his cab. Perhaps you’ll experience it, too.

I arrived at the address and honked the horn. After waiting a few minutes I honked again. Since this was going to be my last ride of my shift I thought about just driving away, but instead I put the car in park and walked up to the door and knocked.. ‘Just a minute’, answered a frail, elderly voice. I could hear something being dragged across the floor.

After a long pause, the door opened. A small woman in her 90′s stood before me. She was wearing a print dress and a pillbox hat with a veil pinned on it, like somebody out of a 1940′s movie.

By her side was a small nylon suitcase. The apartment looked as if no one had lived in it for years. All the furniture was covered with sheets.

There were no clocks on the walls, no knickknacks or utensils on the counters. In the corner was a cardboard box filled with photos and glassware.

‘Would you carry my bag out to the car?’ she said. I took the suitcase to the cab, then returned to assist the woman.

She took my arm and we walked slowly toward the curb.

She kept thanking me for my kindness. ‘It’s nothing’, I told her.. ‘I just try to treat my passengers the way I would want my mother to be treated.’

‘Oh, you’re such a good boy’, she said. When we got in the cab, she gave me an address and then asked, ‘Could you drive through downtown?’

‘It’s not the shortest way,’ I answered quickly..

‘Oh, I don’t mind,’ she said. ‘I’m in no hurry. I’m on my way to a hospice.

I looked in the rear-view mirror. Her eyes were glistening. ‘I don’t have any family left,’ she continued in a soft voice..’The doctor says I don’t have very long.’ I quietly reached over and shut off the meter.

‘What route would you like me to take?’ I asked.

For the next two hours, we drove through the city. She showed me the building where she had once worked as an elevator operator.

We drove through the neighborhood where she and her husband had lived when they were newlyweds She had me pull up in front of a furniture warehouse that had once been a ballroom where she had gone dancing as a girl.

Sometimes she’d ask me to stop in front of a particular building or corner and would sit staring into the darkness, saying nothing.

As the first hint of sun was creasing the horizon, she suddenly said, ‘I’m tired.Let’s go now’.

We drove in silence to the address she had given me. It was a low building, like a small convalescent home, with a driveway that passed under a portico.

Two orderlies came out to the cab as soon as we pulled up. They were solicitous and intent, watching her every move.

They must have been expecting her.

I opened the trunk and took the small suitcase to the door. The woman was already seated in a wheelchair.

‘How much do I owe you?’ She asked, reaching into her purse.

‘Nothing,’ I said

‘You have to make a living,’ she answered.

‘There are other passengers,’ I responded.

Almost without thinking, I bent and gave her a hug.She held onto me tightly.

‘You gave an old woman a little moment of joy,’ she said. ‘Thank you.’

I squeezed her hand, and then walked into the dim morning light.. Behind me, a door shut. It was the sound of the closing of a life..

I didn’t pick up any more passengers that shift. I drove aimlessly lost in thought. For the rest of that day, I could hardly talk. What if that woman had gotten an angry driver,or one who was impatient to end his shift? What if I had refused to take the run, or had honked once, then driven away?

Looking back on that day, I don’t think that I have done anything more important in my life.

We’re conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great moments.

But great moments often catch us unaware-beautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one.

—–

Life gives us all such moments — I call them “Blue Moments” — where a brilliant light shines through the ordinary moments in our ordinary days. They come unsolicited and unannounced, and provide us the gift of significance and, if we are lucky, the opportunity to serve.

What it is important is to remember that these ARE gifts, and that we cannot receive them if we are not open to them. We need to listen closely, watch closely, and take care not to rush past or through them when they arrive. They are the fabric of our lives, and they will weave themselves with complexity and beauty if we give them time to do so.

Thanks again to Ken Nurburn for sharing this story of “The Power of One“.

Have a great week!

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6 thoughts on “Monday Motivator: The Important Moments

  • Paul McConaughy says:

    Well Scott…thanks for the tears… and the renewed focus on our good lives.

    Paul

  • Patricia Hanley says:

    Thanks for publishing this one. I never tire of it and it is such a good reminder of the things that in life that are really important.

  • Becky Reeder says:

    Someone like me who is always rushing to cram as much as possible in a day really needed this story. I am encouraged to slow down and experience the miracles that life has.

  • Pam Jodway says:

    Wow. This took my breath away. Thank God for special people in this world who ease the pain of others. Thanks for sharing.

  • Terry Taylor says:

    Thanks, Scott. I will share this story with our school staff. Faith in people can transcend all other beliefs.

  • Kevin Willett says:

    Spend a day in a barbershop. Most days can be high-tension and fast-paced due to customers always in a hurry. Until….somebody like the elderly lady in the story comes by. Two things that are certain about a persons life, there is a beginning and there is an ending. Two milestones that only happen once per event, per life. If one is lucky, they might have the privilege of being a part of that beginning or, the ending of a persons life. If one is even luckier, they won’t be in such an uptight rush to recognize it and be a part of it in a positive way. Good fortunes are not always extrinsic. Giving a moment or two (or more) to make someone happy for the first time or the last time is an intrinsic reward that will go on with you right up to when your own last milestone arrives.